Glitter Jars for Crafting, Photo Props, whatever

Final jars that can be used for a multitude of items. 

Final jars that can be used for a multitude of items. 

I help run a large crafting group where we find deals on crafts.  We, Lisa and I, try to help out fellow crafters.  So, I did a large buy on Martha Stewart Glitter Paints and glitter a few years ago for making Christmas ornaments, painting wine stem glasses and other items.  

Figured I would show the tutorial here as several have been asking me about getting them again.  I don't have any of my crafting websites up anymore, so will utilize the photography blog to help them out.  Hope my photo friends don't mind.

This will show the basics of using Martha Stewart Glitter Paints method and also a Mod Podge technique using fine glitter.  

So, which one is the best.  It depends on the end use.   I love the MS Glitter paints as I can run them through a dishwasher when needed.   The mod podge ones don't seem to hold up as well.  For a one time use, mod podge technique will have more sparkle and a lot less time.   The Mod Podge technique can be sealed with a variety of different products, but I have never tried it.

Everything you need to do the Martha Stewart Glitter Paint method.   I do use a small bowl to put the paint in.  Water & soap clean up!

Everything you need to do the Martha Stewart Glitter Paint method.   I do use a small bowl to put the paint in.  Water & soap clean up!

I pulled out my fall colors.  Copper is what I ended up using.        The alcohol is just plain rubbing alcohol I use to clean any glass that is going to be painted or have adhesive vinyl added to.     Glitter paint, standard pint mason jar and a Paint dabber.     

***Another thing that can be done prior to use of the Martha Stewart Glitter Paints.  You can use an aerosol paint or any good glass paint, and paint the jar first.  If I had a copper metallic type paint, could've painted at this step, it would be a solid base, so no candle light would show through.***

Squeeze some paint into a bowl, onto a craft sheet or a paper plate and load up the dabber.  You may add extra glitter at this point if you wanted to.

Squeeze some paint into a bowl, onto a craft sheet or a paper plate and load up the dabber.  You may add extra glitter at this point if you wanted to.

I like using the dabber for the glitter paints, but you can use a brush, sponge, whatever.   If you have regular fine glitter, you can absolutely add more to this if you wanted to.  Many use one bottle of MS glitter paint to a small jar of glitter.  Just load up your brush, sponge or dabber and start dabbing. 

The bubbles will go away.

The bubbles will go away.

I just start dabbing all over.   I hold the jar on the inside with opposite hand (taking the pic at the moment). It will bubble a bit, but they go away on their own.   After the first coat, I rinse off my dabber.   I set it up on a paper towel sponge side down.   I have used these many times and they are still in great shape.  I have quite a few, so you can leave it sit with the paint and do your second coat in around ten minutes...maybe a bit less.    Great time to toss some clothes in the dryer ;)

First coat

First coat

This is a basic first coat.  You can keep adding some more. Then let it dry for a bit. This paint seems to dry pretty fast.   

Copper glitter jar is on the right.  Mod Podge technique is on the left.   

Copper glitter jar is on the right.  Mod Podge technique is on the left. 

 

This is the copper glitter jar on the right after 2 coats.  I got a bit sloppy and it shows with a candle in it.   This is being used for some Halloween mini sessions so I think its perfect.   I didn't want a thick coat as I want light to show through this jar.    The jar on the left is a simple mod podge technique.    The flickering of light really has some movement in the copper jar.    If you let the Martha Stewart paints set for 21 days, it is completely cured and dishwasher safe.   I do it differently and it is NOT recommended anymore.  I use the oven.  When I first started using these paints 2 or 3 years ago, the oven technique was in the directions.  For some reason ,that isn't listed anymore.  I don't know if it was deemed unsafe, or what happened.    I never had an issue so always cured mine with the oven.   If you really want to know that method, just email me at northscreations@gmail.com   

Onto look at the Mod Podge technique.  

Outdoor Mod Podge, Wow glitter, a jar or piece of glass and a brush.   Jar was cleaned with rubbing alcohol first. 

Outdoor Mod Podge, Wow glitter, a jar or piece of glass and a brush.   Jar was cleaned with rubbing alcohol first. 

Outdoor Mod Podge, Wow glitter, a jar or piece of glass and a brush.   Jar was cleaned with rubbing alcohol first.  Any brush, sponge, dabber will work fine for this.  

All that has been done is dipped the brush into the mod podge and "painted" the outside of the jar with the mod podge.  I do it fairly thick as I want that glitter to stick.    I immediately add the glitter.    Lay a piece of paper on your work surface or a shoe box is great for this.   

All I have done so far is poured glitter all over the jar.   I stopped here for the picture.   Cover the jar with the glitter.  Pour some more on.  Keep the jar over the paper or the shoe box.  When you are done, you will have a lot of glitter on the paper or shoebox.   Tap the jar to let it release any loose glitter then set it aside.    Now....all that wasted glitter.....not wasted at all.   Pour the loose glitter back into its original container....no waste at all!  And whyyy didn't I take a picture of that.....

Mod Podge is a bit quicker.   Once its set up and dry, you could seal it with a clear sealer, liquid or spray to help hold that glitter on.     

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Macro shot done with a 105 Macro lens.  Alien Bees camera left and one light just over my shoulder. 

Macro shot done with a 105 Macro lens.  Alien Bees camera left and one light just over my shoulder. 

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Copper jar with 2 coats.  Blue wine stem done 2 years ago, 3 coats of Martha Stewart Turquoise, used regularly and put in dishwasher.